Sunday, April 29, 2012

Cold fusion, or something equally as important?


Godes' hypothesis is interesting for those with even a smattering of physics in their background. First of all, he holds that the heat which is coming from infusing hydrogen into nickel or palladium is not coming from "cold fusion" in the classic sense of the term. It is not a deuterium fusing with deuterium reaction as takes place in the sun or H-bombs and which requires extremely high energies.
What seems to be happening in this new kind of fusion is that when hydrogen is "loaded" into nickel or palladium and subjected to the proper kind of an electromagnetic pulse, the hydrogen nucleus which is a positively charged proton acquires and electron which turns it into a low energy free neutron. Now a low energy free neutron is something very nice to have for it quickly combines with other protons to form deuterium, tritium and finally quadrium. The quadrium only lasts for an instant before undergoing a process called beta decay turning it into helium.This is where Einstein and E = MC2 comes in. The beta decay of quadrium results in a loss of mass which is turned into heat. If all this pans out as claimed, it could be one of the most important secrets of nature that has ever been discovered, for our energy problems are over.
This new hypothesis, it is not yet a theory, says that It would be possible to use water as the source of all energy that mankind could ever want with no bad or radioactive leftovers -- only helium and heat. Note that Godes says that if the reaction is done properly, the nickel or palladium which are only used as a matrix to hold the hydrogen in one place, are not consumed in the reaction. For those who are skeptical, and I don't blame you for this a lot to comprehend, I recommend Brillouin's web site (www.brillouinenergy.com) where you will find some reasonably comprehensible explanations and videos as to just how all this supposedly works. For those conversant with Bose-Einstein condensates, the Molecular Hamiltonian, Heisenberg confinement energy, and the dense mathematics of nuclear physics there are papers there for you too.
Read it at Energy Bulletin

It's beyond my ability to critique, but it looks like it is actually happening.
Brillouin Energy says they have a contract with SRI International to design and build a prototype of what they call a "Hot Tube" boiler. If the concept works well Brillouin would license the technology to the world's boiler makers who presumably would work overtime replacing every fossil fuel fired boiler on the face of the earth. And that is just the start.
Brillouin Energy may be poised to become the hottest stock ever (pun intended).

4 comments:

Matt Franko said...

Tom,

I have been following this issue on the web too and there seems to be "smoke"...

But FD: THIS COULD BE A COMPLETE FRAUD.... So we have to be careful...

http://www.e-catworld.com/

This site follows the Italian Rossi.

Here is another one (Greek firm wouldnt that be ironic!):

http://cleantechauthority.com/defkalion-announces-lenr-date-mitsubishi-enters-lenr-market/

They are reporting here a 2012 roll out.

This would be a "game changer" for sure. Some of these firms have put down dates that are later this year so I guess we wont have to wait too long to find out if they are BSing.

Resp,

Neil Wilson said...

It's an interesting hypothesis that explains the effect that 'cold fusion' appears to show.

Interesting that they have come up with a theory that tries to explain the facts.

What a pity economics isn't more like that.

Septeus7 said...

I'm waiting for the independent lab report from a third party which includes the flow calorimetry. Until we get proper testing from disinterested parties it's all talk.

I do hope that it is real not only because the economic and environmental potential but it would be a kick in the pants for mainstream physics which in certain ways is as bad as mainstream economics.

Matt Franko said...

This is another one Ive been looking at,( goes for the automotive market):

http://www.blacklightpower.com/introguide.shtml

caveat emptor

Resp,